MONSEES & MAYER, P.C. - Missouri Trial Attorneys MONSEES & MAYER, P.C. - Missouri Trial Attorneys
816-361-5555
866-774-3233
Navigate Our Site
Practice Areas

Kansas City MO Personal Injury Law Blog

About Monsees & Mayer Missouri Lawyers

The attorneys at Monsees & Mayer handle cases where people have been injured. If you need a lawyer for personal injury representation in Missouri or Kansas, call 866.774.3233. http://www.mmmpalaw.com

Inmate sues jail for failure to diagnose cancer

Doctors and medical staff at any facility in Missouri and the rest of the country are trained to look for signs of illnesses that are more serious than the common cold or sore throat. When left untreated for some time, cancer can spread quickly through the body, leaving patients with little hope for survival. For this reason, the law punishes doctors for their failure to diagnose, which may incentivize doctors to pay particular attention to patients who think they might have center.

Although a Montana jail inmate complained of a sore throat for about a year, and mentioned several times that he may have cancer, staff at the prison dismissed his symptoms. Instead of taking action to test the man for cancer, staff members advised him to gargle salt water and take over-the-counter pain medications.

Surgery patient dies after sponge is left inside body

When surgery is performed in Kansas City, Missouri, certain protocols must be followed in order to ensure that the patient is as safe as possible. If sponges are used, they must be counted before and after the procedure to make sure that all of them are removed. If any are left inside the patient, serious problems can arise.

This was the case for a woman who underwent a surgery in February 2009. Because the surgery took 17 hours to complete, there were some shift changes. This may account for why a laparotomy sponge was left inside the woman’s body, however, the doctor was informed that the sponge count was off. The doctor took out one sponge and ordered an X-ray, but didn’t look at it. If he had he may have noticed that it showed a sponge inside the woman’s body.

Study: too many MDS mum on counseling birth mothers about toxins

Many doctors say that, because they are uncomfortable broaching the subject, they do not routinely discuss the dangers of toxic contaminants in the environment with pregnant mothers they examine and treat.

They need to overcome that reluctance.

Indeed, doctors' hesitancy to have what one lead author in a recent study on environmental risks calls a "big picture talk on environmental exposure" can bring dire consequences in given cases.

Rx for accurate diagnosis: learning to talk to your doctor

A decades-long government study revealed last year that the failure to properly diagnose a medical illness or disease is the medical error that outranks all other mistakes committed by doctors.

In fact, medical misdiagnosis is not simply the most common of all medical errors; it also results in the most dangerous outcomes and brings about tremendous financial costs to the medical industry and consumers.

Given the central role that missed and delayed diagnoses play in hospitals and clinics across the country, including in Missouri, it seems most logical to pose this straightforward question: How can high misdiagnoses rates be curbed?

Focus: hospital, doctor negligence in cerebral palsy case

A recently concluded medical negligence trial in another state has a fact pattern and jury conclusions that are widely relevant regarding birth delivery complications, and we note the material details in today’s post for our readers in Missouri and elsewhere.

It instantly bears noting, of course, that any delivery involving substandard medical care that results in injuries to either a baby or mother is flatly tragic. That fact is sadly magnified because negligence by its very definition indicates that an alternative outcome -- a safe and commonly expected outcome -- is customarily expected in the absence of preventable mistakes.

It is when those mistakes patently occur that juries respond by finding in favor of families that suffer from such errors.

Medicare probe to cost poorly ranked hospitals millions

Similar to other industries, money is a key consideration in the health care industry.

Obviously, persons in the Kansas City area and throughout the rest of the country who pay insurance premiums don’t need to be reminded of that fact. And as painfully high as premiums are, that doesn’t stop the outflow of funds for most consumers needing medical care, who typically cough up large amounts of money for deductibles, out-of-pocket expenses, medications and additional costs.

One consumer that has long tired of the spiraling costs -- especially paying hospitals for health outcomes in which preventable medical errors occurred -- is the federal government.

Purposefully constructed: a dangerous hospital environment

Are hospitals safe places?

That seemingly innocuous query is in fact a loaded question and a sure debate starter among commentators who routinely weigh in on the medical industry.

There is no question, of course, that medical facilities in Missouri and across the country are venues in which doctors routinely save patients' lives. On the other hand, though, evidence abounds -- with data being disclosed by diverse and broad-based sources -- that hospitals and clinics can be very dangerous places indeed for patients seeking medical care.

Myriad studies over the years have estimated that high numbers of patients -- potentially hundreds of thousands, in fact -- die annually form preventable medical error after being admitted to American hospitals. Mistakes run a wide gamut, ranging from surgical error and medication mistakes to facility-acquired infections and wrong/delayed diagnosis.

Mandate requiring use of electronic logging devices expected in 2017

Every year, thousands of Americans are injured and killed in motor vehicle accidents in which large commercial trucks are involved. In some of these accidents; the drivers of semis, tractor trailers and buses are found to be in violation of one or more regulatory trucking laws.

To improve safety within the trucking industry, federal regulations and laws exist that restrict the number of hours a truck driver can work consecutively and weekly. Additionally, commercial truck drivers must pass regular drug and alcohol screenings and ensure their vehicles are regularly inspected and maintained.

Charges of neglect against 17 nursing home staff memebers

An individual may come to live at a nursing home for a variety of reasons. Elderly residents who may have health issues and concerns that make it difficult to remain in their own home or rely upon the care of family members; tend to make up the majority of nursing home residents. Other residents come to live at nursing care facilities for rehabilitation after an injury or surgery and some residents have medical conditions that warrant round-the-clock care. Regardless of why an individual is living at a nursing home, both they and their family members trust and rely upon staff members to follow resident care plans and promote the health and wellbeing of all residents.

Video footage captured by a hidden camera that was placed in the room of a 56-year-old nursing home resident, recently lead to criminal charges being filed against 17 nursing home staff members. The camera was secretly placed in the man's room in June of 2013 and revealed a pattern of intentional and gross neglect by nursing staff members.

The challenges facing brain injury survivors

The human brain is a complex and delicate organ which acts as the control center for all body processes. Unlike a broken bone which typically heals over time, an injury to the brain may result in an individual suffering numerous side effects and problems, many of which are permanent and difficult to initially detect.

In recent years, medical research has shed light on the devastating physical and mental injuries that can result from even minor brain injuries. Sports injuries, car accidents, slip and falls and medical errors are all common causes of brain injuries. Today doctors know more about the causes and therefore how to prevent brain injuries, however, there are still few effective treatment options.

Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb | Top Attorney Personal Injury 2011-2012 Best Law Firms | U.S. News | Best Lawyers Super Lawyers Kansas Association for Justice | Eagle 2013 findmyaccident.com | Kansas Accident News | Member U.S. News | Best Lawyers | Best Law Firms 2010 10 Best 2014 | Client Satisfaction Award | American Institute of Personal Injury Attorneys Million Dollar Advocates Form

About Monsees & Mayer Missouri Lawyers

The attorneys at Monsees & Mayer handle cases where people have been injured. If you need a lawyer for personal injury representation in Missouri or Kansas, call 866.774.3233. http://www.mmmpalaw.com